Body

All body panels have been replaced with Kevlar except for the doors (which are new) and rear bonnet. The pattern was made from plastic padding and hardboard. The mould was then taken from the pattern in 19 separate pieces, all edges having a return on them. The body panels comprising of a one piece front and rear was then moulded from Kevlar. Mounting points were then locally moulded into the body. The body took 3 years to complete. Pop up headlights were incorporated, original motors were retained. All rubbers and trim are new.

Creating the body from plastic padding, the front is based on a 935. I had a picture in a magazine which I measured and then scaled. A1/4 ton of padding was used in total.

Body

Nearing completion.

Body

Laying the mould proper.

Body

All 19 pieces mounted to a steel frame for support.

Body

Removing the body proper from the mould. An extremely satisfying moment.

Body

Smashing up the pattern. It had to be done!

Body

View showing exhaust cooling fan.

Exhaust-Fan

Pop up headlights.

Popup-Head-Lights

An air to water intercooler is employed, as opposed to the more common air to air. There is more work involved with an air to water system, but I would have struggled to find somewhere to mount the large intercooler element used in an air to air system. A CB400 motorcycle radiator is used to remove heat from the cooling liquid. The heat exchanger is mounted directly above the inlet manifold and was originally designed for marine turbocharger applications. An electric water pump is used to circulate the cooling liquid and is manufactured by Jabsco 59500 Series. An electric fan draws air through the radiator at slow ground speed, this is controlled by the ECU and switches off at a predetermined speed. The electric water pump turns on at a predetermined engine temperature and then stays on, in fact the fan will not turn on until this temperature is reached as well.

Intercooler-Rear